Trevor Abes: Writer

Tag: how to invest

Young Canadian Investor #13 — The Benefits of Delayed Gratification

Far be it from me to tell you to not indulge in the pleasures of youth, whatever those amount to for you. You need to fill your time with experiences now to be able to look back fondly on them later when energy, passion, and priorities have evolved you into a different person. Don’t worry, I’m not here to be a wet blanket.

What I’m here for is to illustrate how investing is the bridge between your horny, idealistic, sleep-deprived self to the person you’re going to become after you’ve lived your fair share. It may not be immediately worth it, but investing now can lead to opportunities that aren’t presently available to you.

“The answer is dreams” — Haruki Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart.

If you follow through on some of my suggestions about saving money, invest in stocks for at least a decade, and stick to making regular contributions, that extra 40 or 50 grand just lying around, while unimaginable now, will be available for you to take the next major step in your life. That may be starting a business, starting over somewhere new, or putting a down payment on a house, really any fantasy turned into tangible reality due to the benefits of compound interest and living below your means.

If I may get a little heady and sentimental, what do you dream about? If I may get a little more to the point, you already know that time is an inexorable progression toward pushing daisies, so what are you waiting on to move closer to the life you want?

It’s really all about rustling up your first $1000, investing it in a TFSA, and contributing to it from there until you reach your target number. If you think this investing business is too complicated for you, I beg to differ. My new book, Nine Steps to Successful Investing: A Guide for Young Canadians, will walk you through the process in plain language in no more than an afternoon. Give it a go if you’re ready for your nest egg to grow at a considerably greater clip than the pennies your bank throws into your savings account every month.

Feel free to drop any questions in the comments!

Disclaimer: This article is meant for general education purposes only. It does not constitute financial advice as I am unaware of your personal situation. Consult with a professional who abides by a fiduciary standard before making any investment decisions.

Young Canadian Investor #3 – A Step-by-Step Checklist

You’ve probably heard plenty about investing your money, perhaps through coworkers, your parents, or by mistakenly flipping the channel to CNBC. The question about how to actually accomplish this, though, doesn’t yield a readily-available answer. Well, here’s your answer.

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I won’t go on at length about each numeral, because you can already find that information in my intro to investing. This is more about offering you an eagle’s eye view of that intro so you can take in how the investing process works. Here we go:

  1. Choose financial goals. Could be retirement, a car, an education, whatever you like.
  2. Choose investments that will allow you to meet those financial goals. If it’s short-term, a high-interest savings account that pays you around 2% per year will do. If it’s medium-term, say 3-5 years, an aggregate bond fund, which pays out a long-term average of 2-4% per year, will serve you well. If your goal is 5 years away or more, investing in a global portfolio of stock funds is your best bet because you can expect a long-term average return of 7% per year.
  3. Determine your risk tolerance. If you are risk-averse, you should have more bonds and cash than stocks in your portfolio. If you have the stomach to see your investments fluctuate in value, sometimes by half or more, with the probability of a higher return, you should own more stocks.
  4. Construct your portfolio. Whether that’s 20% bonds and 80% stocks, the inverse, or some other mix, depends on your risk tolerance and the return you need to meet your financial goals. That said, unless you’re a stock-picking genius, you should always diversify, which means owning stocks and bonds from all over the world in many different industries. ETFs are the cheapest and most efficient way for young folks just starting out like you and me to put such a portfolio together. Here’s an example for you. Focus on the lowest 12-month drawdown to get a sense of how much stocks can drop from year to year.
  5. Open a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) to hold your investments in. The former allows you to defer taxes by minimizing your taxable income by the amount of your contribution, which only makes sense if you’re making a good salary, while the latter can only be funded with after-tax dollars. Both allow investments to grow tax-free.
  6. Buy shares in your chosen investments to match the percentages in your portfolio. See the “Build an ETF Portfolio” video series for instructions from Justin Bender of Canadian Portfolio Manager.
  7. Contribute to your investments on a regular schedule that works for you.
  8. Rebalance once per year. This means selling some of your investments that have done well over the year and buying more of those that have done poorly to get you back to the percentages you chose in step 4.
  9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 until you meet your financial goals.

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If you have any questions, feel free to leave them in the comments!

Disclaimer: This article is meant for general education purposes only. It does not constitute financial advice as I am unaware of your personal situation. Consult with a professional who abides by a fiduciary standard before making any investment decisions.

Young Canadian Investor #1 – Compounding is the Point

The point of investing is to use compound interest to get yourself closer to your financial goals. It can seem like magic at first, but compounding simply refers to how an investment will grow exponentially if you regularly contribute to it and allow it to grow over large periods of time.

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The bike is metaphorical. It represents your financial journey. It’s a stock image; you got me. Pun intended.

$1 invested that grows on average 7% per year will become $3.87 in 20 years.

$1 invested with monthly $1 contributions that grows on average 7% per year becomes $511.41 in 20 years.

When it comes to putting money away for the benefit of your future self, there really isn’t much else to say.

That said, to make compounding work for you, you need to know which investments have the best expected return, which of them fit your financial situation, and how to go about acquiring them. To learn a little bit more about getting started, you can pick up my intro to investing here.

I’m also available to teach you 1-on-1 over Zoom if you prefer.

Disclaimer: This article is meant for general education purposes only. It does not constitute financial advice as I am unaware of your personal situation. Consult with a professional who abides by a fiduciary standard before making any investment decisions.

Investing Is Hard And I Don’t Have Any Money: Savings Basics For Young Canadians

I’ve rewritten this article into an e-book called Nine Steps to Successful Investing: A Guide for Young Canadians. Find a copy in the shop.

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