Young Canadian Investor #10 – Common Investing Questions Answered

by trevorpantera3112

1. Don’t I need to already have a considerable amount of money to invest? Not anymore. It used to be commonplace for funds to have $1000 or $2500 minimums to invest, but you can now buy ETFs for free on Questrade without a commission, even if it’s one share at a time. And just for reference, the Vanguard FTSE All Cap Canada ETF, which invests in a basket of stocks meant to represent the entire Canadian stock market, currently trades for $26.03 per share.

2. What’s wrong with enjoying myself and my money now if life is short and you never know what could happen tomorrow? Nothing at all. In fact, another way to look at investing is as a way to prolong your enjoyment of life until the very end. It’s a trade-off, really, between putting a few dollars away without sacrificing too much in the now, and risking going broke when you can’t work anymore. Whether that means saving $100 a month or $10000, the point is that your future self will really appreciate it. 

3. This investing stuff is way too complicated for me. Has anyone put it all into plain language so I can educate myself at my own pace? Yes, indeed. Behold.

annie-spratt-hc7kZmrQPYU-unsplash

4. If investing in the stock market is so great over the long term, and helps set you up for a more comfy retirement, why do only about half of Canadians engage in it? Because holding stocks for decades requires a strong stomach. It isn’t easy to watch your globally diversified investment portfolio drop by 20% about every five years, and by a third to half or more every decade or so, on its way to providing you with an average 7% return.

5. What’s inflation? Inflation refers to the sustained rise in price that most goods experience over time. In Canada, it’s 2% a year or so, meaning that the 7% return mentioned above is actually 5% adjusted for inflation.

6. Isn’t a house a better investment than putting money in the stock market? No, because of the money it costs you to maintain and live in it. Here’s a detailed breakdown courtesy of Ben Felix, an investment and financial planning professional based in Ottawa.

7. Can’t I just save money instead of investing? Sure, so long as you’ll be able to give yourself the life you want when you’re older. If you save $300 a month for the next 20 years, you’ll have $72,372 by the end of it. If, instead, you invest that money, and earn a 7% return over the same period, you end up with $157,489. Give this compound interest calculator a whirl and figure out how much money you’ll need to lead your idea of a good life.

Feel free to drop any questions in the comments!

Disclaimer: This article is meant for general education purposes only. It does not constitute financial advice as I am unaware of your personal situation. Consult with a professional who abides by a fiduciary standard before making any investment decisions.